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the Big Blog Company | The network is always stronger than a node
“Who yer callin' a sparrow, you schmuck?!”
The bird on the back.
September 19 2004
Sunday
The network is always stronger than a node

Blog as a node and blogosphere as a network

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Not every company needs a blog, but every company needs the support of a network. Some companies make the mistake of thinking that their node is strong enough to circumvent or even topple the network - just think back to AOL’s ‘walled garden’ delusions only a few years ago. They thought that their content could supplant or compete with the entire internet.  Blogs are stronger because they are networked digital paper.

The network that each respective company needs in order to succeed will vary. We have had conversations with enough people to know the usual objections - My company doesn’t need to engage with angsty teenage bloggers! Our customers and industry peers are high-level executives in a very specialised area! - so here is the key thing to remember:

The network that each respective company needs in order to succeed will vary. Within the wider network, within the wider blogosphere, there is a more specific (though not wholly identifiable) network, a more niche curve in the blogosphere, where your company should probably be engaged. If the curve is currently unoccupied, be the seed that kicks it all off and watch the flora flourish.

Ignore the network at your peril. Engage it and reap the benefits.

Further reading: Netflix flicks off a blogger, Netflix regrets flicking off a blogger; TrackBack comes of age; Macromedia Blogs and the Death of the ‘Official Story’

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